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Below is a list of all the recently added content, ordered from newest to oldest.

(History Article)
--July 3, 2019. In honour of the 125th anniversary of "Megantic Outlaw" Donald Morrison's death, QAHN is pleased to re-issue the following short article on the response to Morrison's arrest by the Scottish community of the Eastern Townships.
(History Article)
The St. Albans Raid of October 19, 1864 is one of the most celebrated incidents in Border lore.
(History Article)
Born in 1845 on his parents' farm at Kingscroft, in Barnston Township, Arthur Osmore Norton studied at nearby Barnston Academy. By age 16, Norton was working as a clerk in a local general store.
(History Article)
From 1860 to the early 1900s, the St. Francis Valley was the main centre in Canada for the production of slate.
(History Article)
Three components make up the explosive combination of black powder: saltpeter (potassium nitrate), sulphur, and charcoal (carbon).
(History Article)
(History Article)
In its infancy, hydroelectric power in the Eastern Townships was in the hands of a variety of small, local companies.
(History Article)
Beginning in the 1850s, the Eastern Townships were the centre of a massive "copper rush". One of the first copper mines in the area was in Leeds Township.
(History Article)
(History Article)
In the early years of settlement, farmers had to make their own shoes, harnesses, and other leather necessities. When a cow died, the farmer and his wife would scrape, cure, and stretch the hide. The leather could then be used for making everything from patches for mending clothing to door hinges. When tanneries began to appear in villages, the nasty chore of curing cowhides was not one that was widely missed by many people.
(History Article)
An animal that was essential to the settlers was the sheep, whose fleece could be used to produce wool.
(History Article)
The first settlers who were granted land in the Eastern Townships promised to build grist mills and roads within the first two years of settlement.
(History Article)
While workers elsewhere were suffering the work shortages and poverty of the worst part of the Great Depression, the "Three Villages" in the early 1930s were enjoying full employment.
(History Article)
(History Article)
(History Article)
Although Massawippi is by no means a ghost town, the village is a long way from the vibrant little community it once was.
(History Article)
A hamlet in Potton Township, Vale Perkins, or East Potton, as it was once known, was named after Samuel Perkins who settled in this vicinity in the 1790s.
(History Article)
Built in 1875, Potton Springs Hotel and its famous sulphur springs attracted thousands of guests from all over eastern North America.
(History Article)
PRESERVING MEAT
(History Article)
Canada is often called the land of the maple. Indeed, the maple leaf is our national emblem. The Eastern Townships is one of the areas in Canada best suited for maple syrup production.
(History Article)
The 19th century saw the growth of agricultural societies all over the Eastern Townships.
(History Article)
Cows were milked in the morning and evening. Before the advent of electricity and milking machines, the chore had to be done by hand.
(History Article)
During the winter, when the ground was frozen and covered with snow, the men and boys of the farm would take their axes and cross cut saws and drive their teams of horses into the woods.
(History Article)
Apples have been cultivated for the past four thousand years. They were introduced to North America from Europe by the early colonists in both New England and Canada. It has been recorded that the first apples in North America were grown in Acadia in 1635.