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Below is a list of all the recently added content, ordered from newest to oldest.

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It was another good crowd at this past weekend's Heritage Talks lecture in Knowlton... next stop: Atwater Library in Westmount!
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Marion Greenlay has been QAHN's bookkeeper since the organization was founded nearly 20 years ago. She is also a key volunteer for both the Townships Sun and the Lennoxville-Ascot Historical and Museum Society (LAHMS)... Long may she reign!
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QAHN co-sponsored a trivia nite, organized by the organization Youth 4 Youth, last week at the Golden Lion Pub in Lennoxville. Emily Desormeaux, of Townshippers' Association, another partner, reported that the event had been a great success, and possibly the first of many. QAHN intern Bishop's University student Duncan Crabtree helped to animate the evening.
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--February 13, 2019. 1. b. Pearl ash from the hardwood forests. Beef and dairy products would later become the main agricultural goods produced in the area. 2. b. American squatters. The Abenakis had hunted the land long before but had not settled permanently. Before 1791, the land had not been parcelled out to British or French-Canadian settlers. 3. d. St. Francis River. 4. b. It would remain an empty buffer zone between the United States and Lower Canada. 5. c. Those who owned the land had no interest in settling it.
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--February 12, 2019. 1. What was the very first form of agricultural produce that the early Townships colonists profited from? a. Squash fields abandoned by members of the Abenaki nation b. Pearl ash from the hardwood forests c. Grains (flax, wheat, barley) d. Beef and dairy products 2. Which group first permanently settled the Eastern Townships region? a. Loyalists b. American squatters c. The Abenaki nation d. Retired government officials
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QAHN's 2nd Annual Eastern Townships Heritage Fair, Melbourne, October 20, 2018. Keith Wilcox, President of the Georgeville Historical Society, with a prized artefact. Photo - M. Farfan
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L to R: QAHN Project director Dwane Wilkin; MP and federal International Development Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau; QAHN ED Matthew Farfan.
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QAHN's own Terry Loucks (centre, holding sign) hosted the inauguration of Quebec's first National Healing Forest, on his property in Fitch Bay. Photo - courtesy.
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Sponsored and organized by the Quebec Anglophone Heritage Network (QAHN).
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--September 6, 2018. 1) c 2) a 3) a 4) a 5) c 6) a 7) b 8) c 9) b 10) d
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--September 6, 2018. 1) c 2) a 3) a 4) c 5) c 6) a 7) b 8) d 9) b 10) d
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--September 6, 2018. The nineteenth and early twentieth centuries saw a huge railway boom across the Eastern Townships. It was driven by the need to access raw materials, a desire for quick transportation, the growth of industry, and a mania to build more and more branch lines. Literally dozens of railway companies competed for territory and markets.
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--September 6, 2018. The nineteenth and early twentieth centuries saw a huge railway boom across the Eastern Townships. It was driven by the need to access raw materials, a desire for quick transportation, the growth of industry, and a mania to build more and more branch lines. Literally dozens of railway companies competed for territory and markets.
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Alexander Reford of the Reford Gardens in Grand-Métis, was the guest speaker at QAHN's final event of its Spring "Heritage Talk" series, held at the Colby-Curtis Museum in Stanstead, Quebec on June 3. Photo - Renee Arshinoff.
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Q.A.H.N., the FHQ, and fellow Eastern Townships-based heritage organizations gathered today at Uplands Cultural & Heritage Centre in Lennoxville for their bi-annual meeting. (Photo - M. Farfan)
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As part of the Quebec Anglophone Heritage Network's ongoing "Heritage Talks" lecture series, guest speaker Grant Myers gave a well-attended talk on the spotted fever outbreak in the border regions of Quebec and New England at the beginning of the 19th century, at the Lennoxville-Ascot Historical & Museum Society (LAHMS), at Uplands Cultural & Heritage Centre in Lennoxville. Myers is the Vice President of QAHN. (Photo - MF)
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It was a full house for the fourth lecture in QAHN's ongoing "Heritage Talks" series. Nearly 60 participants joined QAHN and its partner the Missisquoi Museum at the Stanbridge East Community Centre to hear a talk by Frédéric Chounard and Charles Lussier called "Journey Down the Pike: Reflections on Missisquoi’s River Heritage."
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War profiteering at the Brome County Museum... the third conference in QAHN's ongoing "Heritage Talks" series. Photo - MF
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--January 19, 2018. The nineteenth and early twentieth centuries saw a huge railway boom across the Eastern Townships. It was driven by the need to access raw materials, a desire for quick transportation, the growth of industry, and a mania to build more and more branch lines. Literally dozens of railway companies competed for territory and markets.
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QAHN / Townshippers Open House, Marguerite Knapp Building, Lennoxville. December 2017. Welcome wagon: Joanne and Big Ears! (Photo - MF)